Tag Archive for goals

The Memes are Lying to You – Rerun

There is a common cultural trend nowadays, to ignore the ‘haters’ in life. I’ve seen a thousand colorful pictures with trite sayings explaining how only your dreams matter, how everyone who tells you no is trying to drag you down, and to not allow those people ‘power over you.’. Of course it’s very true that there are always people who are negative for no reason, who do harm and intend to do nothing less. But the ‘ignore the haters’ trend can very easily be taken too far.

In the voiceover industry, there have been tectonic shifts over the past 20 years or so. What was once an industry exclusively conducted in professional studios has now morphed into an army of at home talent who buy some equipment, hang some blankets, and record some stuff. There are those who regard this trend with somewhat of a jaundiced eye, seeing raving packs of lowballers and people who are diluting the market. Others may view things more charitably, seeing it as an opportunity to expand the market, and allow more flexibility in terms of how the work is done.

Where these two trends intersect is in the way that some voice talent ferociously defend how they do things. Whether it’s low rates, or artistic choices in audiobook prep, these people will fight to the death that their choices are just as valid as the anyone else’s and no one can deny them the right to do whatever they like.

But there’s a few points I think those folks are missing:

  1. It isn’t personal.

    No one is attacking you. Seriously. It may seem like people are lining up to take potshots at you, but I promise you, I have met hundreds of voice talent in my 5 years doing this, and the vast majority of them are really nice people. In most industries, the kind of advice and real world experience that you can draw upon FOR FREE would cost you a great deal of money. People want to help. What they are sharing are things that already work, because most of the folks who are sharing often in those groups are working professionals. No, you don’t have to robotically follow their advice, but it can really pay off to carefully consider their thoughts and experience, because this is about more than your choices, this is about your business in a whole. Do you really want to dismiss this, and lose out on the chance to reach your goals faster?

  1.   This is real world advice.

When you ignore or dismiss advice from working pros, you’re not ignoring words from people who are rich and famous and have no connection to the regular working stiff. Each and every one of those people have worked their way from beginner to pro by tenaciously pursuing excellence and craft, and learning every step of the journey. Yes, there is bad advice out there–vet your advice! If someone is well regarded, knowledgeable, and experienced, you can find out pretty quickly with a few questions and some quick searches. If someone is promising you the world when you do this or that thing, or if you pay them lots of money? Yeah, that you can ignore. But when someone who is living and working where you want to be with your career gives you advice? Step outside of yourself, quiet your ego, and listen.

  1. Ignore your ego.

As I’ve said above, there are plenty of people online and in the real world who are negative just for the sake of being so. But, the majority of opinion and action isn’t something to shrug off for ‘your way’. What experience and background do you have to substantiate your opinion? Where is your expertise? I’m not saying these things to dismiss you-again, as above, this isn’t personal. However, if you can look at the bigger picture, if you can step outside of yourself, and truly become humble and learn, you can find success much more quickly and thoroughly than you will driving yourself very quickly in the wrong direction.

  1. What ARE your goals?

Fundamentally, the higher end voice hirers DO have standards. There are specific things that you will need to approach those people, and it isn’t negotiable. Do you want to do voiceover as a sideline? A few extra dollars here and there? Then keep doing what you’re doing. Keep ignoring those ‘haters’. But if you want more, if you want success, then ignoring those who came before is going to get you nowhere. It’s not that you have to do the same thing, creativity and innovation are certainly both valid and valuable, but defending your views against all comers, accusing and finger pointing, and not accepting the validity of someone else’s ideas at any cost? You’re going to have a hard time creating that career.

  1. Beware of ripples.

We are a connected community. Although you may not see the voiceover hirers in the Facebook groups, there are some there. And more importantly, if you are known as a jerk in the community, people aren’t going to forget, and your reputation will suffer. Perhaps you don’t worry about what other voice talent might think of you. Well, that’s valid, except for one magic word. Referrals. I know quite a few talent who refer work to others, and who seek out people of particular voice niches. (Accents, bilingual talents, etc) who are reliable to use as names for their clients. And you never know who will hear or see something. Things on the internet don’t go away, and something you said weeks, months, or years ago, can easily come back to haunt you.
In conclusion, there is more. There is more than you, there is more than your opinion, more than the current state of your business, more than the obvious and immediate consequences for your actions. Thought, consideration, and reason can lead you away from some serious roadblocks you can create for yourself.

The Importance of Down Time

It’s a strange word to some of us. Down time. The life we live and the businesses we run can eat every spare moment that we give it. I know people who have looked at me very strangely when I’ve told them I try to take weekends off. There’s always more to be doing, business wise, if you don’t have recording (or in my case, editing) to do, there’s always some clerical or marketing task left undone. I know that I’ve often felt guilty when I take time for myself, but my recent illness helped remind me that I need to make that space.

Without it, the stresses and strains of the work day build up like fatigue poisons in your muscles during hard labor. If you don’t make an effort to let those go, it’s easy to make a poor judgement, or get angry when you don’t need to, or any one of a number of mistakes because your resources are short when you need them to be. Maybe you feel like you don’t need that time, and perhaps you eat work for breakfast and thrive on daily tussle with whatever comes your way. But I bet even you, fire-eater, could use a break once in a while. An hour in a coffee shop. A relaxing hot bath. Even if the break is brief, I still bet it would renew and rejuvenate you more than you might realize.

There’s a common thread in entrepreneurial thought these days that you have to work yourself to the bone to make it. Perhaps it’s a cultural thing? I know that there’s the old fashioned ‘Protestant work ethic’ but I don’t want to assume that it’s only an American idea. I really fight against the idea, nonetheless. I believe that it makes for staler work, and a far less healthy you. Better to proceed a touch slower on the ladder to success and enjoy my journey a bit more. What do you want to remember, at the end of your life?

Personally, I take refuge in a couple of hobbies to help spend my down time. I like to paint and write, (the image for this blog is a painting I did a while back.) and also to play video games and read books. I’ve never been one much for TV. But honestly it doesn’t matter so much what you do as long as you have something that allows you to relax and forget for a little while all the things you have to do and the pressure of business.

Hope you can find something to enjoy today!

You Gotta Spend Green

Last post, I discussed the importance of charging a fair rate for your voiceover work. This post is a companion to that, because I want to also mention how you’ve got to spend to make.

I often see newbies coming into the Facebook and other groups asking for mentors and recommendations. That’s not in and of itself bad, but when you buckle down and start building something that is going to take you places–your business–you want to build it right, and not have to come back later to fix mistakes or try and rebuild client relationships. It might seem hard or make you wince to imagine how much you’ve got to pay for a good coach or a demo, but trust me, in the long term it’s worth it.

Let me give you an example from my work in audiobooks. In more than one case, I have gotten a job from a frantic client email that says ‘this took way longer than I thought it would! Help! I need to make my deadline!’ (Or sometimes they’re way past their deadline!) What does spending money have to do with this? You need to spend time with an audiobook coach to understand the process and the marathon involved in audiobook recording. If you’re going to self edit, you need to understand exactly how long that will take you, and factor that in to your time. And honestly, in order to create a well functioning assembly line of audiobooks, you should outsource at least the proofing part of your work. Yes it involves spending money, but you can cover production costs in your rate.

Or other cases, where someone who didn’t know their equipment or software wasn’t able to make ACX specs and had their book bounce back. Or they edited something in a way that made them sound bad. Or their mic was backwards, or they had ferocious static. They didn’t check with an engineer, or they didn’t get their space looked at, or they didn’t do one of many costing things before they got started.

The ultimate result of things like this is your client relationship and your reputation as a voice talent. Your ability to make your way in the industry in general rests on your product–your voice–and you want to make what you hand out as good as possible, as soon as possible, because if you damage one of those relationships early on, you don’t generally get a second chance to impress the client.

You’re Worth Green

My friends, rates are a common and sometimes contentious battle in our industry. I’ve seen a very common thread of thought that when you begin in voiceover (and particularly in the audiobook part of the industry) you have to accept lower rates as you ‘build your portfolio.’ It’s probably wise not to charge top tier dollars, but no matter what you should always make sure you’re making enough to cover your expenses and turn a profit. Not doing so is not smart business. Voiceover is an expensive industry to start out in, that’s for sure, but it’s important to build habits and reputation that will keep you going there for the long term. Cheap is not a word that you want to have associated with you, in my opinion. It’s doesn’t denote craftsmanship and hard work, which is what good voiceover is made of!

Most voiceover talent I know have worked their butts off over the course of years to improve themselves and their craft. They’ve spent thousands on equipment, training, courses and more, and their rates should reflect that! Even if you’re so new that the shiny hasn’t worn off your mic, you’re worth more than bottom dollar.

There’s a segment of talent that I have seen around social media who seek out the lower paying jobs, and are quite content to work a great many low paying gigs, rather than seek out the higher paying jobs. They can (I have read some quite lengthy arguments!) get quite angry when you question this strategy, not only for their own work, but for the health of the industry in general. I know it’s pretty impossible to change anyone’s mind on the internet, but the ‘oh ignore them they’re just haters’ mindset doesn’t really help this. I think it’s important, no matter what you’re doing with your life, or what industry you’re a part of to not dismiss expertise in your field. Don’t get so stuck in your own perspective that you leave behind advice that could save you a headache and fill your wallet better!

But as I said, my friends, don’t be afraid to seek advice on rates, to look for guides–I have heard good things about the GVAA rate guide–and to believe in your own worth as a voice talent. You are part of a creative, growing, evolving industry, and you should be proud of that fact. Plus, your rates are about more than you, you are affecting the course of the industry as a whole. In general, rates are trending downwards, and it seems more common for companies to ask for exclusive rights buyouts when they’re paying you.

One last side note–I know that we all have struggles, and I would never advocate someone pricing themselves out of a job they need to survive. My goal with this post is to encourage those that are able to think of their own worth and the bigger picture when it comes to what they are charging.

Believe in your craft and remember you’re worth a good rate!

Jeff Bowden Interview – Rerun

jeff1. You have an amazing 40 years of experience in media related fields. How did you get started along this path?

Karen, it has been a very interesting path. I actually started my career as a newspaper reporter after graduating college with a Journalism degree from the University of Georgia. I worked for several newspapers, the last being the Tampa (FL) Tribune. But after my first daughter was born, I felt the need for a change and moved to the arena of public affairs for a multi-county planning agency. There I began to be involved with graphics, speechwriting and photography. This provided a background for an eventual transition to jobs involving the production of multi-media presentations.

I had started in 1969 by recording a speech and adding slides (early multi-media?). After several years and jobs, eventually I was developing multi-image presentations with up to 5 screens, 25 projectors, and computer control that featured elaborate soundtracks. And that last bit, producing sound design, was what eventually captured my attention. I was fascinated in the studio with what the engineers could do and I finally gave in and went to night school to study the craft while maintaining my day job. I felt that know what engineers did would help me to communicate with them more effectively. Little did I realize that I would eventually switch chairs.

After a three-year foray into video production in the late 1980s, I returned to book and bible publishing to launch an audio book library for Thomas Nelson Publishers in Nashville. Interestingly, the first full-length book I directed and produced was a Charles Dickens story and the talent was – wait for it – Ben Kingsley. My first session was even in a London recording studio. Not bad for my first outing. Of course, that was a mountaintop experience and most of my subsequent work was in the valleys.

I produced a total of 12 books that first year (1991) as the fledgling audio book industry (cassettes) was getting underway. These products were two-cassette abridgements, and seemed to find some traction. But while at Nelson in the early 80s I had produced 36 titles as single-cassette highlight audio books that went nowhere. And of course, eventually, the public made their desire for the entire book content, not abridgements, known.

After three years and more than 50 books, I was invited to come to Michigan to Zondervan Publishers, where I spent the rest of my career retiring in 2008. I am not real sure of the final numbers but I probably worked on more than 400 books and eight editions of the Bible during those years, as well as a dozen video-based curriculum kits. It was a fantastic way to spend one’s career. I loved going to “work” everyday.

 

2. You have done production work on an astounding 400 + audiobooks and eight editions of the Bible. How can your experience be of benefit to talents in the creation of their audiobooks?

While I did edit and master most of the titles I worked on, I also spent a lot of time as producer in recording sessions in studios across the country directing authors and professional voice talents. We had a studio in the building, but it was not always convenient for the narrator to come to Michigan, so I went to them. As a result, I spent quality time with some very fine engineers in studios in Tennessee, Florida, California, Colorado, Texas, NY and Washington. And those engineers were always willing to teach me tricks of the trade, which I have always tried to pass on and share.

In my current role as an editor/proofer, I am happy to offer any assistance I can in helping the talented people I am working with to produce the finest audio product. Since I am not involved in the recording, my suggestions frequently involve quality issues such as ambient noises, microphone placement and level fluctuations among others. Most times these suggestions will help on the next project, but I have been asked about many technical issues like microphone choices, use of plugins and outboard devices, noise control, etc.

While on the subject of noise, perhaps you will allow me to get out my soapbox. I have become dismayed over the public’s apparent acceptance of “poor audio”. I was always ticked when a beautiful, high quality video project would have a lousy soundtrack. Money was always spent first on lights and sets, and lastly on the audio. Come on folks, the first word in Audiovisual is – AUDIO.

But in recent years, with the advent of podcasting and Youtube, there is some real crappy audio circulating. I understand that the goal is to get the content out there, but I hate to see this lack of concern over quality spill into audio books. And I have listened to some books from major NY publishers that had some noisy artifacts that I find objectionable. I guess my philosophy is that if one is going to spend hours recording an author’s work, make it the best possible audio you can. And now that many, if not most, books are being downloaded at low bit rates, it is more important than ever to start with some good clean audio. To quote a famous Nashville personality, Mack Truck, “That is my opinion. Ought to be yours!” Nuff said.

3. After you moved back to Tennessee, you described yourself as retired. What led you back into the world of audio production?

After I left Zondervan, I worked under a contract for a year and produced 180 titles using over 25 voice talents across the country. My daughter worked with me, handling scheduling, scripts, proofing and invoicing, while I did the editing and mastering. She trained several proofers and after I finished my contract, she continued to proof for other publishers.

Things slowed down for me and work almost stopped completely after that. I was producing the odd book, taking long motorcycle trips and enjoying “retirement” but I started feeling that there had to be more to it than that. Then last September, I got a call on a Sunday afternoon from a narrator I had never met, but who knew me by reputation. He had three books due and his editor was not able to keep up with recording and editing. I agreed to edit/proof two of them for him. It was exhilarating to be back in harness and under a deadline again.

Then this new friend introduced me to his broker, who also knew of me, and the rest is history. He put my name out to his suppliers and now I am honored to have more than a dozen new friends that I am able to edit/proof for. Since that first call, I have worked on more than 25 books and as of this writing, I am committed for 7 more. Needless to say, I am not riding the bike as much now as before. And that is ok.

4. Do you prefer long form projects – audiobooks – or are you available for other work as well?

While I have produced other audio and video projects over the years, such as radio theatre and audio sales catalogs, I prefer the long form projects if given a choice. I am still doing full production on several titles for one publisher, but I am really fond of my “new career” as an editor/proofer.

5. What is the best way for people to reach you?

I can be reached at [email protected] or by phone at (615) 995-5296.

As a post script, if you know anyone who you think would fit in to my ‘techie’ interview series please email me at [email protected] Also, you can check out previous interviews with Morgan Barhart of SociableBoost.com here, Dan Friedman here, Jeff Kafer here, Eric Souer here, George Whittam here, Dylan Gamblin here, Louanne Frederikson here, Dan Lenard here, and Zak Miller here.

And next week I’ll be talking to another audio professional Jake Walther, that I met on Linkedin.

The Year (I was sick as a) Dog Part 2

I was 36! Congestive heart failure was something that happened to old people! What on earth could be causing this?

Bewildered, but still very sick, over the next couple days I endured. The local hospital did their best to run some tests and figure out what was going on.

The real cause of my swelling, my exhaustion, and my trouble breathing, and this reality of heart trouble had nothing to do with my thyroid. It was an old, complicated medical condition I’ve had for a very long time called an Arteriovenous Malformation. (I’ve linked an article if you want to find out what it is in more detail.) My AVM is a sizeable growth on my left thigh that has been there for about 25+ years. After some searching and attempts at treatment in my mid 20’s, I had kind of given up doing anything about it, other than enduring the regular pain. My treatments hadn’t been covered, and were expensive and difficult to manage on a grocery store job insurance/paycheck.

But as the local hospital was bundling me up and sending me to the big city hospital, I was discovering that all this time, the bad connections in my growth had been putting strain on my heart, and this was what was sending me into heart failure.

I settled into my new room, with the cascade of doctors and residents that comes from being in a teaching hospital, and began the long road back to some semblance of health. The first thing I had to do was pee.

A lot.

Seriously. Apparently all this swelling on my body was not fat as I had thought, but as often goes along with heart failure, it was water. With lots of medicine, I ended up 64 pounds lighter! And at this slimmer, svelter size I was finally able to undergo the definitive testing that would allow the doctors to take measurements and do scans that would pinpoint what they needed to do and where to go next. The scans and relevant indignities undergone, they sent me home just in time for thanksgiving. (And oh was I thankful.)

But those 13 days in 2 hospitals gave me a lot of time to think, and I wanted to share some of these thoughts with my friends, colleagues, clients, and dear readers in general–you’ll find some of those in the next post!

The Year (I was sick as a) Dog

It began like any other year. 2018 was going to be another great year for my life and my business, and I had so many plans to bring forth of things I wanted to do, words I wanted to write, and conventions to sponsor and go to. I was excited to begin another year and see where it took me and my little business.

My illness didn’t start out in any big ways. Around February I noticed that I felt more tired than normal, and that my throat was kind of swollen. I went to my regular doc, and she told me that I was having thyroid troubles, that there was a growth on my throat. It was kind of an ironic diagnosis, as I have a scar along the base of my throat from a nodule removal 25 years earlier! It seemed that my thyroid had decided enough was enough, and it was time to kick it in.

Over the next few months, I struggled through a mish mash of misdiagnosis, poor choice in doctors, long waits to get in to see the right doctors, and many other errors. What I didn’t notice so much while all this was going on was my continually lowering energy level, and my continually swelling size. When I did become conscious of these things, I dismissed the tired from the thyroid, and my swelling size as being part of an unfortunate natural tendency to gain weight, since I didn’t have the energy for exercise any more either. Once I had finally seen the right doctor, I set up thyroid surgery for the source of all my problems.

Or so I thought. As the weeks went by, my body swelled further, and I began to have a continual cough and significant trouble breathing. I continued to believe it was all my thyroid, but at the urging of my friends and family, I finally went back to my regular doc to get checked out. My hope was that she would clear me for surgery. She took one look at me and sent me to the ER.

At that point, I was too tired to care. My mom drove me to the hospital where my thyroid doc had an office, and I quietly waited through the considerable waiting for anyone who doesn’t have a life threatening injury in the ER.

My initial diagnosis stunned me. Congestive heart failure.

No One Size Fits All Solution

One of the biggest lessons that I’ve learned is that most voice talent love the idea of outsourcing some of their work, but many people aren’t sure how to get from their idea to their goal. When they reach out to me, they are very enthusiastic, and also often rather uncertain. They’re looking for answers, but not sure exactly what the task is. I always feel bad when I get these calls, because I wish I had a one-size-fits all easy solution or system on how to create a project from people’s ideas. 

But here’s the thing–even if I did have a system, chances are, it probably wouldn’t work for you. Why? Because every life is different. Every business is different. I wouldn’t offer the same kind of organizational advice to a single mom with young kids as I would to a mom who has older children and a spouse, even though they have some obvious common points. The shape of Single Mom’s life is going to be different, the needs of her children will be different than Married Mom’s would. Also, Married Mom has the potential of asking for spousal help. Though both have to deal with kid interruptions, Single Mom has likely more, and probably a different level of need than Married Mom.  People learn differently, process information in their own way, so it’s pretty difficult to come up with a single plan for everyone.

I’ve done many research or organizational projects for folks, and I’m always happy to do more. But there is one absolutely vital task you ought to complete BEFORE you seek outside help.

What is it?

Know what you want, as completely as possible.

Sounds simple? It isn’t. Let me give you an example. Let’s say you want to get in touch with ad agencies, to open up a new area of business for yourself. You come to me, and you say that, and I ask exactly how much you want to spend, because I could do that full time for a month, and not be done. Then I start asking questions, do you want to look nationally, or regionally? Do you want smaller or larger agencies? I’m happy to ask all these questions to help you define what you’re looking for, but hopefully you can see my point that what you want requires some refining and digging down to actually find it.

Perhaps a more specific example. You want to, say, be more organized. Organized in what? Your daily routine? Your invoicing? How you record? If it’s your daily routine, the only real way to do it is to tailor it to the facts of your life. If you’re like one of the moms in the examples above, it might be helpful to think of your work in terms of 15 or 30 minute periods. What can you get done in that amount of time? If you’re a single person, obviously you have a different dynamic. It’s more likely that you can work for longer periods of time, yet it’s important that you have time for your non-work life also.

The idea is that in order to know what you want and need, you have to break the problem down, to ask a lot of questions in order to specifically identify where the next steps are, and what the best steps are for you in your particular career.
So if you want to take those further steps in life and career, do some hard thinking first, and you’ll find yourself farther down the path than you might realize! It’s so much easier to take the steps you need to when you know exactly what those steps are!

The Memes are Lying to You

There is a common cultural trend nowadays, to ignore the ‘haters’ in life. I’ve seen a thousand colorful pictures with trite sayings explaining how only your dreams matter, how everyone who tells you no is trying to drag you down, and to not allow those people ‘power over you.’. Of course it’s very true that there are always people who are negative for no reason, who do harm and intend to do nothing less. But the ‘ignore the haters’ trend can very easily be taken too far.

In the voiceover industry, there have been tectonic shifts over the past 20 years or so. What was once an industry exclusively conducted in professional studios has now morphed into an army of at home talent who buy some equipment, hang some blankets, and record some stuff. There are those who regard this trend with somewhat of a jaundiced eye, seeing raving packs of lowballers and people who are diluting the market. Others may view things more charitably, seeing it as an opportunity to expand the market, and allow more flexibility in terms of how the work is done.

Where these two trends intersect is in the way that some voice talent ferociously defend how they do things. Whether it’s low rates, or artistic choices in audiobook prep, these people will fight to the death that their choices are just as valid as the anyone else’s and no one can deny them the right to do whatever they like.

But there’s a few points I think those folks are missing:

  1. It isn’t personal.

    No one is attacking you. Seriously. It may seem like people are lining up to take potshots at you, but I promise you, I have met hundreds of voice talent in my 5 years doing this, and the vast majority of them are really nice people. In most industries, the kind of advice and real world experience that you can draw upon FOR FREE would cost you a great deal of money. People want to help. What they are sharing are things that already work, because most of the folks who are sharing often in those groups are working professionals. No, you don’t have to robotically follow their advice, but it can really pay off to carefully consider their thoughts and experience, because this is about more than your choices, this is about your business in a whole. Do you really want to dismiss this, and lose out on the chance to reach your goals faster?

  1.   This is real world advice.

When you ignore or dismiss advice from working pros, you’re not ignoring words from people who are rich and famous and have no connection to the regular working stiff. Each and every one of those people have worked their way from beginner to pro by tenaciously pursuing excellence and craft, and learning every step of the journey. Yes, there is bad advice out there–vet your advice! If someone is well regarded, knowledgeable, and experienced, you can find out pretty quickly with a few questions and some quick searches. If someone is promising you the world when you do this or that thing, or if you pay them lots of money? Yeah, that you can ignore. But when someone who is living and working where you want to be with your career gives you advice? Step outside of yourself, quiet your ego, and listen.

  1. Ignore your ego.

As I’ve said above, there are plenty of people online and in the real world who are negative just for the sake of being so. But, the majority of opinion and action isn’t something to shrug off for ‘your way’. What experience and background do you have to substantiate your opinion? Where is your expertise? I’m not saying these things to dismiss you-again, as above, this isn’t personal. However, if you can look at the bigger picture, if you can step outside of yourself, and truly become humble and learn, you can find success much more quickly and thoroughly than you will driving yourself very quickly in the wrong direction.

  1. What ARE your goals?

Fundamentally, the higher end voice hirers DO have standards. There are specific things that you will need to approach those people, and it isn’t negotiable. Do you want to do voiceover as a sideline? A few extra dollars here and there? Then keep doing what you’re doing. Keep ignoring those ‘haters’. But if you want more, if you want success, then ignoring those who came before is going to get you nowhere. It’s not that you have to do the same thing, creativity and innovation are certainly both valid and valuable, but defending your views against all comers, accusing and finger pointing, and not accepting the validity of someone else’s ideas at any cost? You’re going to have a hard time creating that career.

  1. Beware of ripples.

We are a connected community. Although you may not see the voiceover hirers in the Facebook groups, there are some there. And more importantly, if you are known as a jerk in the community, people aren’t going to forget, and your reputation will suffer. Perhaps you don’t worry about what other voice talent might think of you. Well, that’s valid, except for one magic word. Referrals. I know quite a few talent who refer work to others, and who seek out people of particular voice niches. (Accents, bilingual talents, etc) who are reliable to use as names for their clients. And you never know who will hear or see something. Things on the internet don’t go away, and something you said weeks, months, or years ago, can easily come back to haunt you.
In conclusion, there is more. There is more than you, there is more than your opinion, more than the current state of your business, more than the obvious and immediate consequences for your actions. Thought, consideration, and reason can lead you away from some serious roadblocks you can create for yourself.

The Faffcon Community

I wrote this a while ago. By the time this posts, registration for Faff 9 will have already happened, but I wanted to share the love of my ‘tribe’ here on my blog. 

Every time Faffcon approaches, I can’t help but find myself thinking about my history with this unconference, and everything it has meant to me. Faffcon was the spark that started my business, the reason that I’m sitting here writing to you, and one of the catalysts that changed my life.

Six years ago, I was working in a grocery store chain in NC, living with my brother Eric Souer. To make a long story short, this was a store that put profits over people, and although I made okay money, I was never happy there. I’m not their ideal type of worker-physically fast and efficient-so it was not the best situation all around. Our Dad, Bob Souer came to visit, and he said, “Eric and Karen, you’re coming with me to Faffcon.”

I had no idea what this Faffcon thing was. And I remember feeling very uncertain about the whole situation, I was going to a place where I didn’t know anyone, had no idea what was going to happen, and Dad had just said that maybe people would hire me to do the sorts of things that I had always helped him with. (A little writing, a little editing, that kind of thing.)

My biggest memory from that first Faffcon (Faffcon 2 in Atlanta) was the kindness that people showed me. None of them knew who I was. (Some people had met Eric, but I’d never met any of them.) But all greeted me enthusiastically, and were interested in who I was and what I had to say. I remember going home from the event, on fire and excited to see where I could take this brainful of ideas that I had. Fast forward to the present day, and I am a different, much happier person, enjoying a reasonable amount of success.

But over the years, the thing that truly astonished me was the community that developed from the conference. Friendships were created, businesses grew one another, many people lifted one another up through challenges in both work and personal life. There are strong divisive, dividing elements in our society today, and it has been truly astonishing to see the kind of strong, communal vibe that has developed.

In 2012, after Faffcon 5, Lori Taylor created a Facebook group, Faffcon friends. This group has had a strong element in keeping the community together, and bringing folks together to tap group knowledge, share, or to ask questions. It gives people a place to talk to one another between events, and it’s been a pleasure to watch all the positive interaction. Lori eventually turned the administrator role in the group over to me, and it’s been an interesting job, to say the least!

I decided early on to limit the group to people that have already attended a Faffcon. The reason for that is the intensely personal stuff that is often shared in the group-health struggles, life issues, and the like. I wanted anyone in the group to understand the nature of a Faffcon, the lowering of barriers, to keep it unlike other groups, to folks that “get it”.

One of the phrases often used at Faffcon is ‘a rising tide lifts all boats’. The community is proof of that, and it has been a valuable experience to get to watch it grow over the last five years, and change with the addition of new members with new ideas. My hope for the future is that it can continue to be a place where the good of the group is a big part of what goes on. Through Amy and Lauren, Connie and Pam and everyone who’s ever attended, we have created something unique, in terms of the community, and that it should be nurtured and taken care of, even 2 years from now when the event is no longer happening. Our industry doesn’t have water coolers or company picnics, so what we have is something to hold on to. May it always endure, and continue to spread and bring in new people.

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